December 11th Daily Leadership Message Scriptures and Quotes

PASS THE CREDIT ON TO OTHERS

CATCH SOMEONE DOING SOMETHING RIGHT TODAY AND PRAISE THEM PUBLICLY.

Passing the credit on to others is one of the easiest ways to win with people.

Like H. Ross Perot once said about passing on credit: “Reward employees while the sweat’s still on their brow.” Isn’t it true that one of the very best times to give credit to others is when the amount of work and sacrifice something took is still fresh in their minds? Why wait?

UCLA basketball coach John Wooden, has said, how he would often teach his players who scored to give a smile, wink, or nod to the player who gave them a good pass. “What if he’s not looking?” asked a team member. Wooden replied, “I guarantee he’ll look.” Everyone enjoys having his contribution acknowledged.

Daily Scripture

1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you

1 Thessalonians 5:18

Give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you

Colossians 3:17

And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him

Daily Quotes

“Develop an attitude of gratitude, and give thanks for everything that happens to you, knowing that every step forward is a step toward achieving something bigger and better than your current situation.” -Brian Tracy

“Make it a habit to tell people thank you. To express your appreciation, sincerely and without the expectation of anything in return. Truly appreciate those around you, and you’ll soon find many others around you. Truly appreciate life, and you’ll find that you have more of it.” -Ralph Marston

“Be grateful for what you have and stop complaining–it bores everybody else, does you no good, and doesn’t solve any problems.” -Zig Ziglar

Leaders Leading Leaders
WHAT IS A MAN FOR?
Why does God create Adam? What is a man for? If you know what something is designed to do, then you know its purpose in life. A retriever loves the water; a lion loves the hunt; a hawk loves to soar. It’s what they’re made for.
Desire reveals design, and design reveals destiny. In the case of human beings, our design is also revealed by our desires.
Let’s take adventure. Adam and all his sons after him are given an incredible mission: rule and subdue, be fruitful and multiply. “Here is the entire earth, Adam. Explore it, cultivate it, care for it—it is your kingdom.” Whoa . . . talk about an invitation. This is permission to do a heck of a lot more than cross the street. It’s a charter to find the equator; it’s a commission to build Camelot. Only Eden is a garden at that point; everything else is wild, so far as we know. No river has been charted, no ocean crossed, no mountain climbed. No one’s discovered the molecule or fuel injection or created Beethoven’s Fifth. It’s a blank page, waiting to be written. A clean canvas, waiting to be painted.
Most men think they are simply here on earth to kill time—and it’s killing them.
But the truth is precisely the opposite. The secret longing of your heart, whether it’s to build a boat and sail it, to write a symphony and play it, to plant a field and care for it—those are the things you were made to do. That’s what you’re here for. Explore, build, conquer—you don’t have to tell a boy to do those things for the simple reason that it is his purpose. But it’s going to take risk, and danger, and there’s the catch. Are we willing to live with the level of risk God invites us to? Something inside us hesitates.